Who was Grace Glueck? What happened to her? Death Cause and Obituary

Who was Grace Glueck? What happened to her? Death Cause and Obituary

Grace Glueck was an arts writer from the United States. From 1951 through the early 2010s, she worked for The New York Times.

Pioneering New York Times arts journalist Grace Glueck passes away at age 96

At the age of 96, Grace Glueck passed away on Saturday at her home in Manhattan. She was a pioneering art writer for the New York Times and was instrumental in bringing to light a significant scandal over sex discrimination at the publication.

The Times received confirmation from the author’s family. Christopher Knight, an art writer for the Los Angeles Times, praised Glueck and termed him “extraordinary.” In another, Michael Kimmelman, the architectural critic for the New York Times, praised his former colleague’s writing, calling it “still the gold standard for art reporting” and calling it “savagely funny.”

Grace Glueck Age, Family, Early Life

Grace Glueck was born on July 24, 1926(96 years old). She holds an American nationality and she belongs to the white ethnicity. Her Zodiac sign is Leo.

grace glueck age

Ernest Glueck, Grace Glueck’s father, worked as a municipal bond salesman on Wall Street until the Great Depression and then became an insurance broker; Mignon (Schwarz), her mother, was a homemaker who wrote in the community newspapers.

Grace Glueck Husband, What about his Relationship?

In October 2000, Grace Glueck wed fellow Times reporter Milt Freudenheim. They stayed together up until his passing in January 2022. Freudenheim had four children from his previous marriage, thus they never had children together.

Grace Glueck Career, What was her profession?

In 1951, Grace Glueck began working as a copy girl for The New York Times. She worked in administrative roles for two years before being discouraged from becoming a reporter owing to her sex by a senior editor. Instead, she worked as a photo researcher for the Times Book Review for 11 years. Lester Markel later gave her her own art section in the Sunday magazine, “Art People,” after becoming interested when she saw a Balthus illustration of lolita to accompany a review of Lolita in 1963.  

Glueck joined the newspaper’s staff shortly after she started writing “Art People” as a reporter, critic, and art news editor.  She conducted interviews with Georgia O’Keeffe and Marcelin in 1951, Grace Glueck began working as a copy girl for The New York Times. She worked in administrative roles for two years before being discouraged from becoming a reporter owing to her s*x by a senior editor. Instead, she worked as a photo researcher for the Times Book Review for 11 years.

Lester Markel later gave her her own art section in the Sunday magazine, “Art People,” after becoming interested when she saw a Balthus illustration of lolita to accompany a review of Lolita in 1963.  Glueck joined the newspaper’s staff shortly after she started writing “Art People” as a reporter, critic, and art news editor. She conducted interviews with Georgia O’Keeffe and Marcel Duchamp in that role in 1965. (1970) Duchamp in that role in 1965. (1970).

Other Artists

Additionally, she examined works of art by a number of other artists, including Francis Hines, Cynthia Carlson, George Grosz, Max Weber, Oscar Florianus Bluemner, Mike Kelley, Robert Arneson, Jackie Ferrara, Ad Reinhardt, Joel Meyerowitz, Lucas Samaras, Aldo Tambellini, and Carmen Herrera. In 1969, when Glueck discovered that the Times was not elevating women to the top editorial positions, he addressed a letter to Arthur Ochs Sulzberger that ended with the question: “Why were no women included?”  Five years later, eight of her female coworkers finally launched a class-action lawsuit against the newspaper, alleging sex discrimination in violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Evidence was presented in the form of the “beautiful brunette” remark made to Glueck during her initial Times interview. The issue was settled in court in 1978, and the Times agreed to hire more women at all levels of the corporate ladder and establish annuities to make up for “delayed professional development or denied opportunity.” Eileen Shanahan, the principal plaintiff, gave Glueck credit for her contribution, saying that “without Grace, there wouldn’t have been a lawsuit.” Brooklyn: People and Places, Past and Present (1991) and New York: The Painted City (1991) were co-authored by Glueck and Paul Gardner (1992). She has contributed to the Los Angeles Review of Books and The New Criterion.

How much is Grace Glueck Net Worth?

Grace Glueck’s net worth has yet to be published. We’ll keep you updated if we come across any new information about her net worth.

Also Read:   Famous Disc Jockey & Record Producer, Art Laboe, dies at 97

Which school and college did She go to?

Grace Glueck went to high school. She went on to study English at New York University, where she graduated in 1948. She was the editor of The Apprentice, the school’s literary journal, throughout her time there.

Is She available on any kind of social media platform?

We also looked for Grace Glueck on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms but were unable to locate her. She must have a social media account under a different name, or she may not have any.

Physical Appearance of Grace Glueck’s Height, Weight

HeightNot Available
Hair ColorWhite
Eye colorGrey
WeightNot Available
Body typeFit
Sexual orientationStraight

Interesting facts about Grace Glueck’s should be known

NationalityAmerican
EthnicityWhite
Zodiac signLeo
Relationship StatusMarried

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